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US Modernist Radio - Architecture You Love

Join George Smart and Frank King as they talk and laugh with people who enjoy, own, create, dream about, preserve, love, and hate Modernist architecture, the most exciting and controversial buildings in the world. A program of US Modernist and NC Modernist Houses, the largest open digital archive for residential Modernist design in America.
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Now displaying: October, 2015
Oct 26, 2015

Aidan Buehler is 14 years old. He's an eighth grader in Chapel Hill NC with an interest in drafting.  What he did next is remarkable.  Instead of just piddling around on his computer like most kids, he contacted Chapel hill architect Lucy Carol Davis to be his mentor on a school-wide design competition.  Aidan's house was one of the most elaborate projects.  According to his interview with the News and Observer,

"Basically, I designed a house from start to finish,” he said, although it ended up being larger than planned. He laid out rooms and external design features, furnished the house, and added paint and textures. He did not include a plumbing system, electrical system, or internal wiring. “I did put in some vents and designed it so that, with some editing, it could be built legally I should hope,” he said.  He got some of his ideas from architecture books he read. “For the most part, however, it was me experimenting with random ideas of mine and seeing if they looked good,” he said. “Although I did go into this project with ideas as to what qualities I wanted in my house, my model was constantly changing.”  He estimates that he spent several hundred hours on the project.

George Smart of USModernist Radio chats with Aidan, his dad, Georg Buehler, and Lucy Carol Davis.

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/community/chapel-hill-news/article29888074.html#storylink=cpy

Oct 19, 2015

Nathanial Kahn is a director and producer.  He is also the son of architect Louis Kahn, one of the most influential architects of the 20th century.  In 2003, he produced the Oscar-nominated film My Architect about the life and work of his dad, interviewing people who knew Kahn including Frank Gehry, Philip Johnson, and I.M. Pei.  Kahn created modern buildings with the feel and presence of ancient ruins using concrete.  His brilliant projects include the Four Freedoms Park, the Phillips Exeter Library, the Salk Institute, and his most famous work, the National Assembly building in Bangladesh.

Alexandra Lange is the architecture critic for Curbed and a columnist at Dezeen.  She is a rising authority and a prolific writer for print and digital publications like Architect, Domus, Dwell, Metropolis, New York Magazine, and the New York Times.  Previously a Loeb fellow at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, she taught architecture criticism at New York University and is a leader in the new breed of digital curators, people who curate visually interesting exhibits you see on your screen and not inside a brick and mortar gallery or museum. She is the author of Writing About Architecture: Mastering the Language of Buildings and Cities.

Oct 5, 2015

Eames Demetrios is the grandson (and namesake) of Charles and Ray Eames and leads the Eames brand which has roared back into the public eye.  His mission is communicating, preserving and extending the brilliant work of designers Charles and Ray Eames who were best known by the public for their furniture and for their 125 short films, including the much-heralded-and-still-relevant Powers of Ten.  Their Eames Lounge chair for Herman Miller is one of the most popular furniture designs in the world.  Demetrios is also creator of Kcymaerxthaere, a global work of three-dimensional fiction exploring stories of imaginary peoples, movements, even physical laws -- and then memorializing these stories on bronze plaques.  He has written several books about Charles and Ray Eames—Including An Eames Primer, Eames: Beautiful Details, and The Furniture of Charles and Ray Eames.

Jerry Nowell ran North Carolina’s first all-contemporary furniture store, names, not surprisingly, Nowell’s Contemporary Furniture.  He was the third generation of Nowell since 1905 to bring exciting designs like the Eames chair and many other  iconic furnishings to the state. In 1968, Nowell's became the first all contemporary furniture store in North Carolina.  It was also among the first furniture stores to challenge the “blue laws” prohibiting sales on Sunday and likely the first to hire black salespeople.  Jerry closed the store a few years ago to spend more time with his family.  The 20,000 sf store is greatly missed as a regional destination for Modernist house owners. 

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